The banded birds are back!

gray catbird DK7A2255© Maria de Bruyn resIn a previous blog, I described how six birds were banded in my backyard so I could track them over time. Bird banding has been done for decades, indicating that it is a practice that truly works for monitoring lifespans and locations of individual birds. But it still seemed to me that being caught in a net, having someone hold you as they extricated your legs and wings from the clinging threads, then putting rings on your legs and sticking you into a container (for weighing) would be a traumatic enough experience for you to decide that this geographical area was not where you wanted to be. Anthropomorphizing the banded birds’ reactions meant that I wouldn’t have been surprised (albeit very disappointed) if I had not seen the six birds again.

gray catbird DK7A2210© Maria de Bruyn resMy expectation was almost immediately proved wrong, however, confirming that birds do not stay away from sites where they were given their ankle bracelets. Corey, my tail-less gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) was the first one I spotted again, the very next day after the banding. He has an aluminum band on one leg and 2 red bands on the other.

Since the bands are such different colors, I decided to name the birds as that is easier to note down for sightings. The gray catbird with an aluminum band (they all have this color as it contains their registration number) and white and purple bands became Camden. The catbird with the lovely yellow and green bands was dubbed Clarissa. All three have been very regular visitors to the feeders, proving that a little discomfort was not enough to dissuade them from visiting the always available buffet of mealworms and other delights.

gray catbird Camden DK7A2085© Maria de Bruyn res gray catbird Clarissa DK7A2091© Maria de Bruyn res

The catbirds have a fondness for sweets and like both apples and blueberries. Grape jelly is a real treat, for which they will return again and again.

gray catbird Clarissa DK7A2647© Maria de Bruyn resgray catbird Camden DK7A2198© Maria de Bruy resn gray catbird Camden DK7A1965© Maria de Bruyn resCorey’s return visits have shown how his tail feathers grew in again nicely over time. gray catbird Corey DK7A2472© Maria de Bruyn resI named the Northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) Clancy and I first spotted him again 2 days after the banding. He has not been a regular visitor, however – or I just haven’t caught sight of him among the bevy of other male cardinals that flit around the trees. However, a few days ago he turned up among the apples!

Northern cardinal Clancy  DK7A7771© Maria de Bruyn res northern cardinal Clancy  DK7A7753© Maria de Bruyn res

Carolina wren Willow DK7A2608© Maria de Bruyn resWillow, the Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), has been a very infrequent returnee. When he comes, he tries to stay out of sight, choosing the side of the feeder away from me and only lingering a short while in plain sight. At least I know he is ok.

The one bird I have not yet seen is Rusty, the American robin (Turdus migratorius). I’ve been staring at the legs of every robin that hops around the yard but have yet to see one with leg jewelry. Perhaps he was just a stray visitor the day of the banding? I will certainly keep a look-out for him.

My first re-sighting data were entered into the Nestwatch site on 1 June 2015; it will be interesting to see how long I can maintain this input. Clarissa is a very frequent visitor so I think she will be in many entries. Or perhaps she is just busy right now feeding young ones.

gray catbird Clarissa DK7A2504© Maria de Bruyn res gray catbird Clarissa DK7A2503© Maria de Bruyn res gray catbird Clarissa DK7A2498© Maria de BruynEastern bluebird IMG_3881© Maria de Bruyn resIn the meantime, I am monitoring two nests for data entry; one for Eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis), who have babies in a nest box, and one for gray catbirds, who have a nest in the middle of a shrub next to my carport.

The catbird parents are ever so vigilant and call out warnings to me whenever I approach the shrub. They hesitate to go into the shrub with food when I am near, even though those babies must be hungry. I finally got a view of them through the twigs when they were close to fledging. They are now hopping around on twigs in the shrub near the nest. Yesterday, when I came too close, Mama catbird dive-bombed, actually grazing my head!

Gray catbird IMG_3887© Maria de Bruyn res gray catbird IMG_3873© Maria de Bruyn

The parents in both pairs are very diligent about bringing the babies meals, working as a team. One catbird parent seems to be good at collecting a variety of foods, in one case bringing three different insects at once (presumably one for each baby). I will look forward to seeing the young ones out and about and sincerely hope my neighbor’s cat doesn’t get them.

gray catbird DK7A2939© Maria de Bruyn res gray catbird DK7A2937© Maria de Bruyn res

Bird watching is an enjoyable way to spend time; doing it and contributing to scientific data collection is even cooler!

4 thoughts on “The banded birds are back!

  1. Pingback: New bird generations emerge in my yard! | My beautiful world

  2. Pingback: Nest Watch citizen science – 2016 edition | My beautiful world

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