Emerging again in 2022 – part 1

1 leaf P9146097© Maria de Bruyn res

Not too long ago, a friend asked me whether I’d stopped writing my blog, a question that truly startled me. Over the past months, much of my time has been spent addressing new as well as ongoing problems and challenges, but I also kept taking nature walks and photographing wildlife and natural phenomena.

I stored photos and notes in folders for potential blog topics, so in my mind I was still engaged in the writing process, but then I realized that my last blog was published in mid-October 2021, 3 months ago! So, I’ve now made a conscious effort to set aside some time to again share some photos and observations of what I’ve been seeing the past half-year or so.

I’ll re-start my blogging with photos in the plant (part 1) and bird (part 2) families but without a specific focus. They are simply visuals that appealed to me, like the suspended leaf above. I hope you enjoy seeing them, too.

2 rose PC018346 © Maria de Bruyn res

At the end of autumn/start of winter 2021, I still had some lovely flowers blooming in my garden. A rose that hadn’t had any buds all spring and summer suddenly sent out a lovely bloom!

The Rose of Sharon had bloomed all season.

3 Rose of Sharon P8070836© Maria de Bruyn res

4 Rose of Sharon P8070832© Maria de Bruyn res

The hot lips sage and lantana emerged in mid-summer and then lasted well into winter.

5a hot lips sage P9146178 © Maria de Bruyn res

5 lantana P8252416 Maria de Bruyn res

In our area, people often take autumn trips to the Appalachian Mountains as the fall colors tend to be really wonderful then. This year, many people remarked on how gorgeous the trees were in our area and some people decided to just admire the beautiful trees nearby.

8 autumn trees IMG_1972 (Maria de Bruyn) res

6 Jordan Lake PB063613 © Maria de Bruyn res

7 Jordan Lake PB063637 © Maria de Bruyn res

A tree in the Cane Creek Reservoir lake looked lovely against the fall background and the far shore of the lake made for a beautiful scene, too.

10 Cane Creek IMG_0014 © Maria de Bruyn res

9 Cane Creek IMG_0006 © Maria de Bruyn res

My maple tree delighted me with its bright colors but the leaves didn’t last too long.

11 maple PB169564 © Maria de Bruyn res

When the vegetation took on winter browns and beige hues, it still was beautiful to see.

12 leaves IMG_1908 © Maria de Bruyn res

13 seedsPC173288 © Maria de Bruyn res

And there were pockets of green left here and there, making for nice abstracts

14 stems P8028400 © Maria de Bruyn res

or settings for insects, like spiders.

15 spider P8251982 Maria de Bruyn res

16 web P8081563 © Maria de Bruyn

And the rains left behind droplets that shimmered and delighted before dissolving with late-year sunshine.

17 water droplet PA063700© Maria de Bruyn

May your coming year will just keep getting better and better as it goes along! (Next up, some birds that have been delightful the past weeks.)

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Quebec chronicles – landscapes and signs of humanity: part 1

   

To conclude the series on my springtime bird migration trip to Quebec, I’d like to share some of the scenery we saw during our daily outings to and from nature reserves and birding sites in two blogs.

Our rental house in the municipality of Saint Irénée was located on a quiet street, lined with houses that seemed to be mainly rentals. It was a good birding street, lined with lots of vegetation as the houses were mostly set back from the road.

The variety of plants and trees there and in the forests that we visited was lovely.

 

 

 

A number of home-owners had taken time to make nice signs for their houses, presumably so they would be easy to find by renters.

 

 

 

One house caught everyone’s eye as they walked the road; it sat high on a hill and was a striking construction that seemed to be mostly glass. The views from there must have been wonderful.

 

 

Other houses’ yards were brightened with art work and nice gardening features.

 

 

When we left to reach each day’s destination, our route invariably passed along the St. Lawrence Seaway, which we could see in the distance as we also passed by permanent residents’ homes and churches.

 

The paper birches and quaking aspens were really beautiful trees that we saw almost everywhere.

 

 

 

The piers at Pointe au Pic and Saint-Irénée were charming and we returned there several times.

One day, a couple had brought a picnic to enjoy, even though it was a bit cool.

The piers were interesting. Fellow traveler Chloe posed near an “object of interest”!

To my delight, one pier had a little neighborhood lending library there.

Numerous signs advised visitors on behavior during their walks on the piers.

 

 

At Saint-Irénée, signs with photos related the history of the town and its pier.

We did not only stay around Saint-Irénée and Pointe-au-Pic, however; see the next blog for other sights we saw while driving around.