A bedraggled sort of day

Carolina wren IMG_4876© Maria de Bruyn resFirst, let this lovely Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) and me wish you – fellow nature lovers and blog readers – all the best as we look to the future in this year of 2015! May your minor disappointments (life is not always rosy) be compensated by love, laughter, health and happiness in abundance!

 

Yesterday may have been a minor disappointment for the wildlife here.Hermit thrush IMG_3106© Maria de Bruyn res On Sunday, it was very cold for North Carolina standards. Together with two other Audubon Society volunteers, I was standing at a local lake in 15°F (-9.4°C) weather waiting to see if any bald eagles flew by for inclusion in the quarterly Eagle Count. We didn’t see any, although this lovely hermit thrush (Catharus guttatus) was nearby eating berries.

Monday was warmer but EXTREMELY wet! Two of my cats awakened me at 5 a.m. and I could hear the rain coming down in a veritable deluge. I wondered if I would be able to see the road to drive for an appointment later that morning (it did let up, thank goodness) and also wondered how the birds and animals were keeping in this unpleasant weather.

Northern cardinal IMG_4462© Maria de Bruyn res

Northern cardinal IMG_4049© Maria de Bruyn res

 

 

 

When it’s cold, the birds fluff up their feathers to trap air pockets by their bodies; this helps they retain body heat and stay warmer. Heavier wet feathers don’t seem to fluff well, though. On the other hand, birds’ feathers are covered with an oily or waxy substance that helps water run off, thereby keeping their bodies drier. Those feathers don’t necessarily look pretty though. Many of the birds were indeed looking bedraggled, some to a greater degree and others just a bit like these Northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis).

red-bellied woodpecker IMG_5005© Maria de Bruyn resIt didn’t seem that many birds were hiding in vegetation to get out from under the downpour. Nope – they all appeared to be very hungry and anxious red-bellied woodpecker IMG_4948© Maria de Bruyn resfor a meal like this red-bellied woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus), who was scolding me for being so close to the feeders!

white-tailed deer IMG_4092© Maria de Bruyn resA few white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were also wet and hungry, including two visitors to my yard that I had not seen before. They were two bucks, one of whom must have been hit by a car. One of his antlers was broken off and he was hopping along holding up his left hind leg, which had obviously been injured.

 

 

 

white-tailed deer IMG_4063© Maria de Bruyn res white-tailed deer IMG_4001© Maria de Bruyn res

white-tailed deer IMG_4055© Maria de Bruyn resA young doe, who visits regularly, stopped for some bird seed, as did the other buck whose antlers had been shed. Their thick hair was coated in raindrops.

The Eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) can curl their tails up over their backs as a kind of natural umbrella, both on the ground and in trees. This individual, who may have been injured by a predator and escaped, enjoyed some apple – first on the ground and then later in the tree away from the blue jays that were hopping around it.

Eastern gray squirrel IMG_4325© Maria de Bruyn res Eastern gray squirrel IMG_4334© Maria de Bruyn res

Some of the birds definitely looked more presentable than other. The three visiting mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) were sleek and beautiful, one using its long tail tobalance as it plucked meal worms from a feeder designed for somewhat smaller birds.

Northern mockingbird IMG_4503© Maria de Bruyn res Northern mockingbird IMG_4467© Maria de Bruyn res

The dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), Eastern towhees (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) and chipping sparrows (Spizella passerina) looked in fine shape, too.

dark-eyed junco IMG_4802© Maria de Bruyn res dark-eyed junco IMG_4729© Maria de Bruyn res

Eastern towhee IMG_4924© Maria de Bruyn res chipping sparrow IMG_4817© Maria de Bruyn res

The bluebirds (Sialia sialis) varied in appearance; a couple looked groomed but wet, while a couple others looked a bit disheveled.

Eastern bluebird IMG_4587© Maria de Bruyn res Eastern bluebird IMG_4588© Maria de Bruyn res

pine warbler IMG_4569© Maria de Bruyn resThe pine warbler (Setophaga pinus) – usually among the more handsome garden birds – unfortunately looked a sorry sight. Fortunately, when the rain ends, he’ll be able to shake that water off and get back to looking like one of the handsome fellas of the avian neighborhood!

pine warbler IMG_4618© Maria de Bruyn

 

pine warbler IMG_4842© Maria de Bruyn res

ruby-crowned kinglet IMG_4777© Maria de BruynThe ruby-crowned kinglet’s (Regulus calendulabrown-headed nuthatch IMG_4409© Maria de Bruyn res) oily feather covering seemed to do well in keeping the rainwater at bay, while the brown-headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla) looked a bit more water-logged.ruby-crowned kinglet IMG_4741© Maria de Bruyn res

The tufted titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) and Carolina chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) join me in looking forward to dryer and sunnier weather in a few days’ time!

tufted titmouse IMG_4350© Maria de Bruyn resCarolina chickadee IMG_4386© Maria de Bruyn res

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