The dance of the sandhill cranes

sandhill crane I77A7926© Maria de Bruyn resDuring my trip to Yellowstone National Park, I had the privilege of seeing what birders call “lifers” – bird species that one sees for the first time. One spectacular sighting – for me – was of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). I didn’t spot them first; I was traveling with two photographers from Michigan who were used to seeing these beautiful birds in their backyards. We had already passed but they kindly returned so I could take a few photos – and then to our delight, the pair of birds performed their mating dance for us!

These birds mate for life and may live to a considerable age. The oldest known sandhill crane was 36.5 years old.

sandhill crane I77A7910© Maria de Bruyn resWhile many of these birds are grayish in color, some have rusty orange coloring, attributable to iron-rich mud in their environment. In Yellowstone, the birds use their long bills to spread the reddish mud over their feathers when they preen and this helps to camouflage them when nesting. Cranes that are not yet mature also have reddish upper parts. Their heads are topped by a red patch.

 

sandhill crane I77A7925© Maria de Bruyn res

 

These birds have very long legs and necks as you can see. Their windpipes curl up in the sternum and give their sounds a lower pitch. Mated pairs will sing in unison, with the female calling twice for every call that her mate makes.

 

 

The males dance when they display to one another. Courtship dances can involve bowing followed by leaps into the air. They may stretch their wings and pump their heads as well.

SANDHILL CRANE I77A7932© Maria de Bruyn RES

sandhill crane I77A7934© Maria de Bruyn res

The pair would dance and stop, dance and stop. A real pas de deux (in French and ballet terms)!

sandhill crane I77A7931© Maria de Bruyn res

sandhill crane I77A7936© Maria de Bruyn ressandhill crane I77A7938© Maria de Bruyn res

sandhill crane I77A7955© Maria de Bruyn ressandhill crane I77A7974© Maria de Bruyn res

Perhaps some ballet terminology was inspired (unconsciously) by the graceful cranes.

sandhill crane I77A7915© Maria de Bruyn res

Grand jeté (jump from one foot to the other)

sandhill crane I77A8005© Maria de Bruyn res

Sur les pointes (on tiptoes)

sandhill crane I77A7935© Maria de Bruyn res

Demi-plié (Half-bend of the knees)

`11111111111111111 sandhill crane I77A7940© Maria de Bruyn

Fondu (sinking down)

Dancers have tried to mimic cranes and while they created a beautiful dance, the sandhill cranes had more varied moves.

sandhill crane I77A7947© Maria de Bruyn res sandhill crane I77A7952© Maria de Bruyn res

sandhill crane I77A8010© Maria de Bruyn ressandhill crane I77A7917© Maria de Bruyn2 res

 

 

sandhill crane I77A7928© Maria de Bruyn res

 

The courtship dance was a tour de force and a highlight of my first day at this national park. In hindsight, I wish I had taped it but I was so enthralled, I forgot. 🙂

 

4 thoughts on “The dance of the sandhill cranes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s