Costa Rican greens and blues

As 2021 proceeds, I hope to post more blogs than last year. In some cases, I’ll manage by showing mostly photographs with little commentary as researching the blogs usually takes a fair amount of time. So to start out with a mainly pictorial blog series, I’d like to share some older photos that I took in 2019 during a visit to the lovely country of Costa Rica with a fun-loving group of birders.

In addition to seeing beautiful tanagers, trogons and other birds, we had the good fortune to see many gorgeous hummingbirds. In this posting, I’ll feature some hummers with primarily green and blue colors. A few I haven’t been able to ID, like the ones above and below, and any suggestions from readers as to species are welcome. The one immediately below right might be a female purple mountain gem….

 

 

We often got really good views of these small birds at feeding stations set up for birders and other tourists at hotels, restaurants, people’s homes and nature parks. The feeders tended to attract crowds — both of people and birds!

 

The green-crowned brilliant (Heliodoxa jacula) is an interesting species as it can look very different depending on the bird’s sex and age.

It is a fairly large hummer. The females have spotted breasts, while young birds are distinguished by an orange or buff-colored throat. (You can see a larger image by clicking on a photo and then back arrow to get back to the blog.)

 

 

       

 

The green thorntail (Discosura conversii) is a smaller bird that lives in the forest canopy of the Caribbean slopes. The first one shown is what I believe is a female, but my ID is uncertain. The bird’s common name is related to the male’s thin tail feathers.

    

The purple-throated mountain gem (Lampornis calolaemus) is another small bird that can make a big impression when the light falls just right on its brilliant throat. It’s interesting to read that the brightly-colored males of this species tend to be dominant over others in their home territories.

 

 

Here in North Carolina, the ruby-throated hummingbirds tend to be known as rather intolerant of other birds near their feeding areas. The various species we saw at feeding stations in Costa Rica often seemed to get along fairly well – at least at the nectar feeders if not around their preferred flowers. Perhaps it was there that the custom arose of calling a flock of hummers a “charm”. The purple-crowned fairy hummingbird (Heliothryx barroti, right) certainly is charming!

The scaly-breasted hummingbird (Phaeochroa cuvierii) looks a great deal to me like a female green-crowned brilliant, so my ID of this hummer may be wrong.

I think I got the blue-hued lesser violetear hummers (Colibri cyanotus), shown below, right. They are really lovely birds.

 

 

I’ll end this blog with a few photos of a large, spectacular hummer with almost iridescent blue coloring, the violet sabrewing (Campylopterus hemileucurus). These were really impressive birds that could keep you in rapt attention.

 

Next up: a virtual photo tour of some of the brown, bronze and reddish-hued hummers that we got to see.